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A SEA VOYAGE

The traveller decides upon a sea voyage.

He books the tickets beforehand.

He wants to have a separate cabin for himself and his wife.

So he asks for a second-class cabin with two berths to be reserved for him.

At the port of departure the passenger, together with a number of others, proceeds to the quay.

The ship he wants to take is moored there.

It is a fine motor ship of the latest design.

The ship is to leave soon.

The passengers mount the gangway and come on deck.

Here stewards are already assembled to show them their cabins.

Some are forward, some are aft, some are amidship.

The passengers settle down in their cabins.

However soon most of them come out on deck.

Here they can breathe the rich sea air and look at the busy traffic of the harbour.

The steamer soon leaves the dock where she3 was moored.

She advances towards the open sea.

She sails at a high speed.

The sea is rough to-day and the ship pitches and rolls.

Some passengers are sea-sick.

Others are not afraid of the rough sea.

They walk up and down the deck.

Sometimes in order not to fall they catch hold of the railings.

Soon the shore fades from view.

In some time the passengers are invited to take dinner in the restaurant.

After that some go down, some prefer to stay on deck, some remain in their cabins.

Towards evening the sea grows calmer.

The passengers enjoy a beautiful sunset at sea.

The next day the weather is better and the sea calmer, though there is a slight rain in the morning.

But later the sun comes out and shines brightly in the blue sky.

The ship passes several other ships.

Towards evening the first port of call is reached.

But the ship does not stay there long.

Soon she weighs anchor and the voyage is 'resumed.

On the fourth day the traveller reaches his destination.

He feels healthy and refreshed; the sea voyage has done him much good.

CONVERSATION

- I have come on board without asking a lot of questions which I ought to have asked1. May I ask you first of all how long the whole voyage from Odessa to Batumi is going to last?

- Three days. Youll reach Batumi on the fourth day counting from to-day.

- Does the ship call at many ports on the way?

- The ports of call are Sevastopol, Yalta, Novorossiisk, Sochi, Sukhumi and Poti.

- Shall we be moored there long enough to make excursions over the towns?

- The ship stops everywhere for four or five hours so you will have ample opportunity to see all these towns.

- Can I send a radiogram from on board ship? You see there are some friends whom I should like to meet me3 at Yalta.

- Of course you can. There's the cabin of the wireless operator who receives messages from 9 in the morning till 9 in the evening.

- Now I should like to walk a little over the ship.

- I'll be glad to accompany you. We are now aft, then shall pass by the captain's bridge and go forward.

- And then let us see all the cabins, 1st class, 2nd class, steerage, the lounge, the restaurant, the bar, the cinema

- Let us. Do you know there is a swimming pool on board. We must see that too by all means.

- We are now entering the open sea. It strikes me the sea is rather rough to-day. Are you not afraid of being sea-sick? As for myself I must confess I am rather a poor sailor.

- I really do not know. It is my first voyage over the sea.

- Look at the waves! Of course it is not a regular storm, but still the sea is rather heavy.

- I am beginning to feel a bit uneasy. Shall we ask the captain or the mate about the weather forecast?

- Let us.


At the Captain's Bridge


- May I know if you expect a heavy sea?

- No, nothing in the way of a storm. There is always some pitching and rolling at this place, because we are rounding a cape. You will see the ship will be steadier presently.

- I wonder if the ship is not late?

- No, it is sailing strictly on schedule.

- Thank you very much for the information. Meanwhile I think I had better go down to my cabin and lie down a little. What wouid you advise?

- By all means lie down. And suck a lemon! There is nothing like lemon when one feels a bit sea-sick!

- Thank you very much for the advice4. I'll follow it.

WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS

NOTES






About myself

A trip by railway

My family

A sea voyage

Our flat

At the doctor's

At the library

At the cinema

The hotel

At the theatre

Street traffic

At the post office

An excursion out of town

Sport

Telephoning

Shopping

A visit

Sightseeing

Park of culture and rest

The soviet union

The dining-room

Elections

At the museum

Sputnic

A trip by air

 

 

 





 

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